Picking first Reishi of 2016

Started picking the first of this years crop of reishi today. Always a very beautiful mushroom. The latin name is Ganoderma lucidum. Ganoderma means shiny skin and lucidum means bright. As you can see from the picture it lives up to its name.

Reishi commonly known as the mushroom of immortality has been revered for their medicinal properties for thousands of years. In traditional Chinese medicine they are regarded as cure all and have been shown to have beneficial effects on immune dysfunction, sugar regulation, liver ailments, fatigue and more. The Chinese name is Ling Zhi.

We will be harvesting reishi over the next few months, it is a slow growing. The next step is to dry them and then they should be ready for our farmers markets from August onwards.

Chicken of the Woods in season now

Added some new pages to our website about wild mushrooms in season now, Chicken of the  Woods and Fairy Ring Mushrooms

http://wp.me/P7neDj-6W and http://wp.me/P7neDj-6G

Where have all the mushrooms gone?

We are at the peak of the Saint George’s Mushroom season here in Essex. We have had perfect weather for them this year with lots of April showers and in the last week or so warm sunny days too. But take a look at these  two baskets of mushrooms.

Saint George's mushroom baskets
A tale of two baskets

The basket on the left has the mushrooms I foraged from about 40 Saint George’s Mushroom rings on the village green while the basket on the right was foraged from 2 small rings on the verge of a quiet lane a mile away. The 2 rings on the verge have produced over 5 times as many mushrooms as the entire village green!

What could possibly be the reason for this I hear you cry? Are there hordes of immigrants scouring our English village greens and removing every mushroom? Are the villagers keen wild mushroom foragers? No! There are no mushrooms on the village green because they have been mown down. The green was mown 10 days before Saint George’s day which was luckily just before the mushrooms started into growth. There were just under a kilo of mushrooms big enough to pick for Saint George’s Day and 2.5 kilo a week later. The second cut was eight days ago on the 3rd May and the battered 200g in the basket is all that has grown since.  The 2 rings in the lane had one mushroom for Saint George’s Day and 250g the week after. Today there was 1.1 kilos in the lane. The village green should have produced at least 11 kilos this week, instead of 200g,  as the conditions have been perfect for them. There won’t be any mushrooms on the green next week  either as the mower was beginning it’s next cut as I left this morning. The verge in the lane has not been cut yet but with the cow parsley coming into flower it won’t be long before the mowers come out along the roads and lanes to make it safe for the poor defenceless motorists in their armour plated boxes.

The reason we don’t see masses of mushrooms popping up in fields and greens is we are obsessed with tidiness. Wild flowers and mushrooms are not given a chance if they dare to grow higher than an couple of centimetres. The relentless whirring blades of the mower slice them into a thousand pieces and scatter them to the four winds. The man/woman operating the mower is oblivious to the destruction they are causing so intent are they on getting the perfect cut. And people consent to this destruction and even complain when it is not done. It looks untidy, it spoils the view, it a danger to motoring.

Mowing is nothing less than habitat destruction. Every time a mower cuts a patch of grass it is creating a sudden change in the microclimate. Allowing the sun and the wind to suck moisture from the soil. Contrary to popular belief mushrooms don’t pop up over night. The whole process takes at least a week. Mushroom formation is triggered by subtle changes in a range of environmental factors: humidity, light, oxygen, temperature. When the grass is cut all of these factors change instantly and the mushrooms are unable to react fast enough. If they are still very small they shrivel and die from lack of moisture. If they are too big they are ripped from the ground and devoured by the mower. With mowers cutting every fortnight or every week in Summer the mushrooms don’t stand a chance. (Did I mention that cutting grass stimulates it to grow more so it needs more mowing).

That is where all the mushrooms have gone.

Wild Garlic Foraging Workshop

Just over a week left before our last Wild Garlic Foraging Workshop for this year. It’s on Sunday 15th May. We’ll be exploring the delights of Suffolk Wildlife Trusts Arger Fen Reserve before heading into the wild garlic and finish off with Carl creating the finest wild food dishes from our days foraging. Anger fen has spectacular bluebells too, which will be in full bloom. You can book your place on the Mushroom Table Shop.

Wild Garlic (1)

A purple Day foraging for St George’s Mushroom

Out in the woods this afternoon looking for St George’s Mushrooms. Not expecting much  as it is the lunar perigee today. They have been a bit patchy this year. Some rings have been dormant others prolific. This bunch weighed in at around 500g

Calocybe gambosum
St George’s Mushroom.

But lots of wild flowers in the woods to see while looking for mushrooms and they all seem to be purple-ish.

Viola canina
Dog Violets

Dog violets have been out for a few weeks but seem at their best now

Dactyolorhiza fuschii
Early Purple Orchids

Early purple orchids are in full flower now

Dactylorhiza fuschii
Early Purple Orchid

This group were taking advantage of a clearing in the woods

Ajuga reptans
Bugle

Bugle, a relative of mint is one of my favourite woodland plants

Ajuga reptans
Bugle

Here’s the top down view showing it has a square stem

Glechma hederacea
carpet of Ground Ivy

Many paths are carpeted with Ground Ivy. You often notice the aromatic smell before you realise your walking on it.

Glechoma hederacea
carpet of Ground Ivy

It’s also known as Alehoof as it was used to flavour beer before hops were introduced

Lamium purpureum
Red Dead-nettles

Another purple plant is the Red Dead-nettle, Lamium purpureum. Called a dead-nettle because it has no sting. It’s in the mint family.

Spring in the woods

Here are a few views from my office today. You know it’s spring when you see wild flowers everywhere. It’s when the woods come alive. Everyone knows bluebells, with their vibrant colour and heady scent.

bluebell woods
Waves of Bluebells

But if your really lucky you’ll see this too

wood anemone
Carpet of Wood Anemone

or this

golden saxifrage
Bank of Opposite-leaved Golden Saxifrage

and keep your eyes peeled for these beauties

Sweet Violets
Sweet Violets
Dog Violets
Dog Violets
Garlic Mustard
Jack by the Hedge
Wild Strawberry
Wild Strawberry flowers
Wood Sorrel
Wood Sorrel

Last week of birch sap for this year

The super moon on Thursday seems to have spurred the birch trees into leaf so the sap has finished rising for another year. This weekend we will be bringing the last of the fresh birch sap to the farmers markets in Stoke Newington and Notting Hill.

Wild herbs for pesto
Wild herbs for pesto

With wild garlic and alexanders growing strong we will have our wild pesto herb bunches and wild garlic on the Mushroom Table too.

Wild garlic, wild chervil and alexanders pesto
Wild garlic, wild chervil and alexanders pesto